An Interview with Nathan Cassidy

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Perennially prolific, the terrific Nathan Cassidy has a brand new show for 2019…


Hi Nathan, so where ya from & where ya at, geographically speaking?
I’m from Birmingham and now I live in Hackney in London.

When did you first realise you were, well, funny?
I was about six and it was that atrocious bit at a wedding between the ceremony and the dinner. It was a community hall and I entertained everyone for an hour on the stage. Technically it was my first hour show. I can’t remember the detail but I remember everyone laughing and probably getting emotional at the 40-minute mark when I did a bit about marriage inevitably failing.

Who are your comedy idols?
Growing up it was Rick and Ade, Alexei Sayle, Fry and Laurie and Rowan Atkinson. I’m slightly older than I look (I’m mid to late 20’s). Now it’s Bill Burr, Steve Coogan and anyone on youtube chucking ping pong balls into glasses from a slight distance.

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What are the processes behind the creation of one of your shows, from inception to hatching?
Nathan: I like to have an idea around this time of year for the following year, so I can start creating the material over the next six months in new material nights, I do a regular one in London on Mondays where you hear it all first. I’ve got my idea for next year, and the only danger of that is you put too much focus on the following year too early. It’s a very very very good idea though!! I’m going to take it on a bit of a World Tour, New Zealand and America.

What does your perfect Sunday afternoon look like?
A year ago I’d have said writing comedy, a year ago I used to write comedy all the time. On Sunday afternoon maybe I’d have been in the pub or up on Hampstead Heath pretending to see friends but actually I’d have been thinking about comedy, writing comedy in my head. But then, at the Edinburgh Fringe last year, my life changed. I injured my back, in the same way most people injure their backs, by brushing my teeth, so joined a local gym in a bid to sort out my rubbish core. And I met someone. I met a man that would take me on a year of discovery, a truly bizarre year where I didn’t have to write any comedy to churn out another hour show, perfect.

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You’ve got a new show for 2019 – can you tell us about it?
So yes, I’ve never really been one for observational comedy because nothing from my day to day life I really found that amusing. Much as it would be lovely to find a routine from having a shower usually I just turn the shower on, have a wash, and get out of the shower. But after meeting this guy at the gym, this massive, strong man, he’s taken me on such a bizarre journey of discovery and self discovery that, brilliantly, the show has kind of written itself. I won’t give too much away but he started as my personal trainer, and quickly became much more. Everything about him and our relationship is unconventional, and ripe to stick straight into a comedy show. Let’s just say he is round my house a lot now. But he doesn’t use the shower. But if he did there would probably be a routine in it.

What it is at about this story that demanding a retelling on stage?
Everything. I needed someone to come into my life and shake it up. I think we look for like-minded people to surround ourselves with, but I met this guy who did everything I didn’t. He is at the gym 6am to 11pm every day. That’s all he does. He doesn’t read the news, he doesn’t know what’s going on in the world. He lifts Atlas stones. He’s religious. And he’s opened the door to a new future for me and shone a light on my past. He’s truly changed my life, and my comedy. No one is expecting an observational comedy show from Nathan Cassidy. No one is expecting any show. No one likes stand-up comedy any more. It’s a dying art from. I’m more into piano now.

What are the fundamental differences between the Brighton & the Edinburgh Fringes?
If you want, you can do the Brighton Fringe without seeing anyone else in the industry. Which I’m not saying for one second is absolutely brilliant, but I guess whatever you do you in life can you surround yourself with people who think your job is the most important thing in the world. Sometimes you need people around you that not only are not in your world, but don’t give a damn about anything in your world. And that can open your eyes to what’s important in life, and the direction you want to go in next. None of what I’m doing in comedy is important, however very, very funny it is. There’s a much bigger picture for me now, and this big, strong man has shown me the light. And there are beaches in Brighton that aren’t freezing. And you don’t go bankrupt.

Photography: Andy Hollingworth


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Observational

Caroline of Brunswick

May 4-6 (15:15) PWYW

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www.nathancassidy.com/al

An Interview with Nigel Osner

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Nige Osner is back & he’s off to Brighton…


Hello Nigel, so first things first, where are you from & where are you at, geographically speaking?
I was born in London and still live there.

Your journey to performer is quite a convoluted one, can you tell us the short version?
Will try! I am a non-practising barrister and was employed in the Ministry of Justice. But I had a yearning to be a performer. I began by helping to write, then act in, departmental pantomimes. I fancied myself as rather good, but came to realise I needed singing lessons, courses on acting and the advantage of a good director! I appeared at a couple of fringe venues, doing a mixture of existing material – e.g. Coward, Kurt Weill, Lehrer – and writing my own lyrics. I also started to work three days a week, to spend more time on writing and performing. In 2008 I left the Department and found an acting agent. However, I stopped performing for a bit and got more involved in films or fringe theatre.

In 2011 I thought I would give performing another go. Since then in London I have performed at the Crazy Coqs, the studio at the Other Palace, the Pheasantry and more alternative venues. In 2016 it seemed time to try the Edinburgh Fringe, so I put together ‘Angel to vampire!’, an entirely original show based on my life’s yearnings. My current show, which I will be taking to the Brighton and Edinburgh Fringes this year, is called ‘Too young to stay in, too old to go out!’ What I do is tell stories, whether in song or monologues, as different characters, both men and women – and occasionally supernatural beings!

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You’re quite the polymath, where do you think such a wide array of interests come from?
Creativity can come out in different ways at different times. For a long time I expressed this side by painting, portraits especially. This overlapped with my writing and I had a children’s book published years ago. I helped adapt this into a musical. I have continued writing and enjoy the fantasy genre. However, I particularly wanted to express myself as a performer. By writing my own material at least nobody can say they have seen it done better! As to why there are these different interests, I can’t say. I just need to express myself in this way. I no longer paint though. But underlying everything is a sort of escapism and yet also a desire to be truly myself.

A couple of years ago you performed ‘Angel to Vampire!’ in Brighton and Edinburgh – how did it all go?
‘Angel to vampire!’ is a show about my life’s yearnings. However, I don’t illustrate everything directly. After all, I’m neither an angel nor a vampire! I thought it was brilliant title, but in retrospect not everyone likes vampires and for those who do, there would not have been enough supernatural characters. The show got some good reviews in Edinburgh, including that in the Fringe Review, which was beautifully written, supportive and a joy to have. However, the audience could have been larger so, as with many Edinburgh shows, I lost a bit of money. I also learned lessons for the future about venues and advertising. I stayed for the whole of the Edinburgh Fringe but the following year performed only seven days in the Brighton Fringe. Again, that could have been busier but the feedback was positive and I have now developed a good relationship with Sweet venues.

Can you tell us about the unfortunate break in proceedings from last year’s follow-up show?
Break literally! I had arranged to perform ‘Too young to stay in, too old to go out!’ with Sweet for four early evenings. The first two shows were full and the audience reaction was very encouraging. On the second night I went out afterwards with two friends from London. It was a jolly evening! Nevertheless, I did not get back that late to where I was staying. I had to get up in the middle of the night and somehow my right foot gave way. I could not walk on it in the morning so took myself off to the hospital. I thought I had sprained the foot or possibly broken a toe. In fact I had broken four metatarsals, which was regarded as serious because of potential swelling. As I couldn’t do the show sitting down, I had to cancel the remaining performances and hire a minicab to London. That did not lead to financial profit!

So what is ‘Too Old To Stay In Too Young To Go Out’ all about?
It is about the challenges and occasional opportunities for those who can no longer claim to be young, even to themselves. I examine dating, love, work, holidays – even the gym! I do this with original songs and stories by male and female characters. There’s lots of humour but with a bitter sweet edge. Characters include Gerald who is having a taxing night out in central London; a rich designer who falls for his hunky gardener; the woman driven mad by her companion on a river cruise down the Danube; and a fading star on an endless tour. I am particularly – but not exclusively – aiming the show at an older audience, as I am not sure enough material is written with their concerns in mind.

Have you gained any fresh wisdom from doing the show?
I am no longer twenty-five.

What are the fundamental differences between performing at the Brighton & the Edinburgh Fringes?
The Brighton Fringe is less full-on, less crowded and has more of a local audience, which I find appreciates my material. A huge proportion of the Edinburgh audience come along from outside the city. In 2018 there were 3500 shows. It is not a relaxing experience.

What will you be doing for the rest of 2019?
In August I’ll be taking my show to the Edinburgh Fringe. My aim is to promote interest in a tour of small venues and a London run of an expanded version of the show. I would like to revive ‘Angel to Vampire!’ for Halloween. Apart from that I’ll do bits and pieces plus try to get cast in a play or film. And I’ll hope to write some new material.


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Too Young Too Old

Sweet Werks 2

May 3-5 (17:10)

www.nigelosner.com

An Interview with Katy Schutte

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Katy Schutte is bringing a touch of the Gothic to this year’s Brighton Fringe…


Hello Katy, first things first, where are you from & where are you at, geographically speaking?
I live in London and I grew up in the South; Hampshire, Sussex.

When did you first realise you were funny?
There wasn’t a particular moment for me. My family have a good sense of humour. I guess it was more – discovering that other people aren’t always funny.

When did you first develop a passion for comedy?
I grew up on comedy. My Dad’s favourites were Oliver and Hardy, Morecombe and Wise, Victoria Wood and I saw my first Red Dwarf episode when I was 8 and can still quote series 1-5. I always read and watched comedy and I liked to write it myself from an early age.

Which comedian has made you laugh the hardest?
Many favourites have come and gone for me, but Bill Bailey is still one of the best. He’s chill, musical, mega-talented and still seems very down to earth. I also love Mike Birbiglia and his style of storytelling inspired my last show.

Can you tell us about the Maydays?
The Maydays are my improv family. I have been with the company for 15 years and we continue to develop and aspire and move forward. We were a short form improv troupe at the beginning, then with me and Rachel Blackman going to Chicago to learn, we took on long form improvisation and (with others) spread it throughout the UK.

What are the fundamental differences between improv & sketch comedy, & what skills are needed for each?
Improv is about other people. Improv doesn’t need to be funny. Stand-up is about frequency of laughs. Fundamentally, improv is a group activity and sketch probably means doing a first draft and bringing it to your director or team for re-writes and honing. Improv doesn’t always promise comedy, either; it might be an improvised play. A sketch comedian may not know how to improvise on stage with others and an improv comedian may not know how to write or deliver material. They are different animals.

What is it about being funny in front of other people that makes you tick?
It is thrilling. Knowing that you made other people happy is a superb feeling. The pitfall of all comedy though is that if you take the positives personally, you also have to take the negatives personally. The best thing is to regard your work at a distance. It worked or didn’t, you are still great.

You’ve got three comedians (dead or alive) coming round for dinner. Who would they be & what would you cook; starters, mains & dessert?
Firstly, cooking for three strangers would make me really stressed, so I’d cook easy, familiar stuff. I’d probably get a really good Olive bread to dip in oil and vinegar as a starter, Shakshuka or a feta filo pie made beforehand as the main. Dessert would be a pumpkin or banana cake. I’d want to invite comedian friends, but under pressure I’d invite Mike Birbiglia, Bill Bailey and Tamsin Greig.

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You’re performed at the Brighton Fringe before – in fact you bloody won the thing. What’s the story?
The Maydays won Best Comedy Show with Mayday! The Musical when we were only a few years old as a company. It was a great boost and totally unexpected. Jimmy Carr gave us the award. I was nominated for Best Comedy Show in 2018 for Schutte the Unromantic. I had made the show specifically as a show I wanted to make, not to please anyone or as a career move or marketing ploy, so it was amazing to have my from-the-heart stuff validated. Then Joe Morpurgo bloody won.

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You’re bringing a new show, LET’S SUMMON DEMONS, to this year’s Brighton Fringe; can you tell us about it?
I probably built an appreciative audience from my last show, but instead of capitalising on that, I’ve just gone off on a tangent. I felt compelled to make a show about witchcraft, the post #metoo world, the witch hunt of men and my Grandmother’s haunted house in Wales. It’s semi-immersive folk horror which is pretty far from Schutte the Unromantic. This one is called Let’s Summon Demons.

Where did you get the idea, & is the reality realising your original vision?
I’m really pleased with the show. It was well received at the London Horror Festival and I’m thrilled to bring it to VAULT this week and to Brighton in May. My team is amazing. The design and direction (Jonathan Monkhouse and John Henry Falle) are fantastic. I love the show and I think others will get a lot out of it too.

You’ve got 20 seconds to sell the show to somebody in the street…
If you like The Wicker Man, or any folk horror, if you like theatre that calls your beliefs into question, if you want to be involved, to bare your soul a little bit; this is your thing. It’s made by a witch and it’s fucking awesome.


Let’s Summon Demons

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The Hat at Warren
May 3/4/17/18

www.katyschutte.co.uk