The Saturday Night Live Museum: Chicago

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The Mumble welcome Emily Reilly to the team with a wicked piece of on-the-spot reporting in The Windy City

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Saturday Night Live has always been quite near and dear to my heart; if there’s one thing I’m a nerd about, it’s this show. So, it was truly fitting that I spent my valentine’s day date at a place I’m newly in love with– the temporary SNL museum in Chicago, ‘SNL: The Experience.’ Located at 360 N State St, you’ll find that the tickets are reasonably priced for the inside look at a show with so much history and humor. Here were a few of my favorite parts.

The Full Schedule: Not only are there famous wigs, costumes, and scripts, but each room of the museum serves as a day of the week at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, and shows how the day-to-day madness ensues. It displays where the episode is at in the production process on each day. For instance, Tuesdays include long nights that writers spend hours thinking of pitch ideas for the dreaded Wednesday meeting with Lorne and the host. The Tuesday room had videos of famous writers, like Seth Meyers, talking about this day in particular, as well as a glass case full of scripts from over the years, included some from as early as the 70’s. I was having a moment.

The Glamour: With all the character transformations on SNL, it makes for lots of wigs, head moulds, and allllllll kinds of props to make the characters look believable. It was interesting to see all the designated elements for the hilarious characters that famous alum used to wear–especially the iconic cone head.

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BPYdOWqyQ466f2wRSAJYWwThe Costumes: We were joined by all of the classics from SNL history at this museum, Stefon’s wedding outfit (YES!), the church lady’s dress (isn’t that special?), and even the suit from Alec Baldwin’s uncanny Donald Trump impersonation. There were so many more that you should check out for yourself because this part of the museum was surreal. I felt like I was entering a forbidden Taiwanese Temple or something. Seriously, it was so cool.

The Final Part: After visiting a replica of the control room (which also felt very real, there was a countdown board to the special SNL episode for museum goers only.) The nutshell SNL episode was short and sweet to sum up the museum, and to send off those just finishing the tour. There were very few other people there when I went on a weekday, so it made this experience even cooler. After the mini show, they encouraged a fun photoshoot behind the recreated ‘weekend update’ desk. I was in heaven.

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Conclusion: This was by far, the best museum I have ever visited. I only mentioned a fraction of the memorabilia, props, costumes, quotes, videos, set pieces, and SNL artifacts that caught my eye on every floor; there are so many more I didn’t mention. It’s funny because we were actually about to do the art institute for the 288343476th time. Luckily, my search recommended this gem, and suddenly there was a day I’ll never forget. In other words, DO THIS WHILE IT’S HERE!

Emily Reilly


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Visit Emily’s Blog Here

 

An Interview with Jocelyn Chia



Jocelyn Chia is a superbusy, supertalented comedian. The Mumble caught up with her on her way to The Magners International Comedy Festival…


Hello Jocelyn, so where are you from & where are you at, geographically speaking?
I grew up in Singapore until I was 19. I have been primarily based in New York City, but last year Asia came calling with a lot of opportunities, so now I go back and forth between New York and Singapore.

How did you get into stand-up?
I did this program called She Creates Change for women in life transitions. At the end of the program we had a “calling party” where all the women got into a semi-circle, and one woman would sit in the middle. Everyone then called out what they thought her calling was based on what they knew of her. When it came to my turn, someone said “Jocelyn, you are so so so funny. Every time you speak up I wait to see if people laugh, and they ALWAYS do. I want to see you do stand-up comedy.” And that’s how it all started. My parents hate that girl.

Can you tell us about your experience with MTV?
There is a show on MTV called “Uncommon Sense with Charlamagne Tha God.” Charlamagne was on vacation, so MTV wanted to have a series of guest hosts who were the complete opposite of Charlamagne. If his name doesn’t already give you an idea, you can google him and see why I am indeed the complete opposite of him! But I had to do the show AS him. Meaning they dressed me in these rapper like clothes with a hat and all, the co-hosts addressed me as “Charlamagne”…it was hysterical and of course super cool to be filming in the MTV studios!

What does Jocelyn Chia like to do when she’s not being funny?
Worry about how to get funnier. I’m also very big on self-help so I’d be reading some self-help book like Getting Things Done or Atomic Habits or She Comes First.

Last year you made your Comedy Central Debut on the show “Standup Asia!” – how did it go?
I absolutely loved doing it. Standiup comedy is such a solitary endeavour most of the time so it was amazingly fun being part of a group of comedians all coming together to do this TV show that was NOT a competition. We would go out partying together, eat obscene amounts of food, and even did a giant group podcast – one of Joanne Kam’s podcast episode literally has about 10 of us all chiming in. I got along great with everyone and really bonded with a few of them – Esther Ku for example is a comedian I knew of by name and reputation and I had seen her before on a NYC show but we never ever spoke until Comedy Central Asia – now we are friends and she had me on her podcast and even wants to go on a tour together! So it really was a wonderful experience with so much fun and camaraderie, and we were treated like VIPs with a 5 star hotel stay, press interviews and the like.

You’re washed up on a desert island with an all-in-one solar powered DVD/TV combo & three films, what would they be?
You’ve Got Mail, Love Actually, Mama Mia Here We Go Again (I love Abba so this will be a way to get both music and film on the desert island!)

You’re performing at this year’s MAGNERS INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL; can you tell us where, when & who with?
I have four shows with the festival this year. March 15th 8pm at Cask and Banger, March 21 8pm at Pong, March 22 10pm at McGettigan’s and March 23rd 8pm at Get Juiced.

Will you be nervous before the shows?
Right before I have to go up probably a little, which is par for the course. But I know it will disappear the moment I hit the stage so I don’t worry about any nerves and just let it be.

Would you describe your comedy as Asian or International?
International. In New York I’m performing for a tourist crowd most nights, so my set has to be international. Of course you will get some Asian perspectives, but you definitely don’t have to be Asian to appreciate my humour. In fact most nights in New York, there are zero Asians in the audience. I think Asians don’t really come out for stand-up comedy much!

What will you be doing for the rest of 2019?
I’m in Singapore until the end of March – I’m booked on Magners, and also have headlining shows at The Merry Lion (in Singapore), Myanmar and Borneo. Then I take the first two weeks in April off to go to Europe for a vacation (although knowing me I’ll probably get tempted to do some shows), before heading to NYC. I fly back to New York April 16th and already have a show that night at the New York Society Library. Then in May I am doing a mini tour, and will be performing in Delaware, Maryland and Washington DC. The rest of the year is TBD but I expect it will be pretty fun and exciting!


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JOCELYN CHIA

March 15th: Cask & Banger, Singapore

March 21st: Pong, Singapore

March 22nd: McGettigan’s, Singapore

March 23rd: Get Juiced, Singapore

www.jocelynchia.com

An Interview with Shayne Hunter

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If Comedy were a martial art, Shayne Hunter would be a tenth dan. The Mumble caught a mad, wee blether with the fella ahead of the Magners International Comedy Festival…


When did you first realise you were funny?
At school in grade five we had an exercise to write on a piece of paper traits about the other class mates and I got funny from all the other students. I was so proud. On retrospect it might of been funny not as in ha ha but funny as in something isn’t right…

When did you first develop a passion for comedy?
Probably when I was seven and I heard my mother laughing at Sienfeld – she was a herion addict so it was rare to hear here that happy. Plus I was dyslexic and bad at sports, so at school the only validation I could get was from making other kids laugh. It was either comedian or school shooter. I choose the former.

What is it about being funny in front of other people that makes you tick?
An unhealthy need for validation from others and creativity that helps me to dissociate from the horrific nature of reality.

Which comedian has made you laugh the hardest?
Probably Doug Stanhope, but I love open mic nights, usually it’s awful hack jokes but occasionally some wingnut will do something so odd and it’ll bomb and I’ll laugh my ass off. I remember this one open mic comedian, mid-thirties, talking about strangling homeless people in bath tubs in order to be able to cum and no one was laughing… that was funny!!

What’s so funny about Australia?
In West end in Brisbane there’s a street called Boundary Street that has all the night clubs. It historical name comes from when if the natives crossed it they’d get shot at. These days, the street where all the night clubs are and no one knows the history! Makes me think of the Nazis who after World War Two would of turned Auschwitz into a night club and people would of been like “this night club had such good smoke machines, I love how they come out of these shower heads”.

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You’ve been a top-class comedian for almost a decade now – but you did take a three-year hiatus – can you tell us about it?
I resented the self involvement and egotism of the showbiz “look at me” – how it was corrupting – & I was seduced by far left-wing ideology as it promised to remove those social hierarchies that cause people to be excluded and others to become corrupt in order to win. In the end I found it to be utopian nonsense; those left-wing movements have a different “game” where they compete to see who is the most excluded, and will even become corrupt and cheat and make up how victimised they are. Now I just accept I’m addicted to strangers approval and it’s corrupting elements.

I guess there there was plenty of source material for some shit-hot comedy?
Oh yeah, well I am interested, not in social commentary, but on self-delusion and how universal it is.

Can you tell us about Blaze Against The Machine?
A stand up about addiction – not just the bad sides, but why it happens and the fact that we all have some version of addiction. People who judge addicts the most are often people that have never done drugs, so they don’t know what they are missing out on – I had a friend that went on a 24-hour meth binge and spent ten grand on hookers in one night, yeah, you go do that and then come tell me how your daughter’s wedding day was the best day of your life.

You’ve got three famous comedians coming round for dinner (dead or alive). Who would they be & what would you cook; starters, mains & dessert?
Man I don’t give a shit, what’s important is their work I can see that why would I want to ruin illusion of them as an idol and meet the flawed mortals they are?? “Yeah I had lobster with Richard Pryor, what a jerk”.

You’re performing at this year’s MAGNERS INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL; can you tell us where, when & who with?
Yeah I’m pretty lucky to be traveling across Singapore, Thailand and other places all expenses paid. I think Phil Nickal and Steve K Amos sometime 20thish of March to 9th of April. Man, I love day by day what I am doing, just happy to be on board and see some of the world before I die.

What will you be doing for the rest of 2019?
Studying psychology, writing a book about my anarchist days, working on online comedy videos about cognitive biases and self-delusion.


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SHAYNE HUNTER

March 16th: McGettigan’s, Singapore
March 21st: PONG, Singapore
March 22nd: McGettigan’s, Singapore
March 23rd: Get Juiced, Singapore
April 3rd: Royal Park Hotel, Yangon
April 4th: Royal Park Hotel, Pattaya
April 5th 2019 Westin, Bangkok

An Interview with Imran Yusuf

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The Magners International Comedy Festival welcomes the golden comedy of Imran Yusuf…


Hello Imran, so where are you from & where are you at, geographically speaking?
Hiya, I am from Earth, I am still on Earth and as I write this I am at home on a sunny afternoon in London, United Kingdom on the precipice of leaving the European Union because we will not prosper until we have blue Passports.

When did you first realise you were funny?
Anytime as a kid when I acted up to impress others and made them laugh. As a teen, I was the consummate piss-taker, it was a way to be strong in some social situations and create enjoyable company. Making others laugh is fun and gains one respect, but only if it is done as a natural consequence of who you are. You can’t run around telling people jokes like a weirdo. You have to get them to come to a club so you can stand on stage and do it from there like a professional weirdo.

How did you get into stand-up?
When I saw The Comedy Store TV show in the 90s, I knew I had to become a stand up but didn’t know how. Eventually, I got on the circuit and did open spots. However, the seed had been planted much earlier in my youth, probably from Benny Hill and the comedy of the 80s and 90s and most recently I have remembered that I once wanted to be like Jasper Carrott.

If your style was a soup, what would be the ingredients?
Spices, vegetables and a bit of meat (not pork). You would leave feeling satiated and pleasantly surprised.

Which comedian has made you laugh the hardest?
I once lost the ability to breathe whilst watching Sean Lock live when he recorded Live at The Apollo in 2007 or 2008. I was sitting near the front and one of his gags was so good, I thought I was going to die because I couldn’t draw a breath. It was such a good gag that I studied it and broke it down to understand why it was so good. Then I told a friend the joke, and then he couldn’t breathe either. I think my background in video games testing helps me understand the genius construction behind really good joke telling.

You’re washed up on a desert island with an all-in-one solar powered DVD/TV combo & three films, what would they be?
Jaws, Armour of God and Star Wars: Return of The Jedi.

Can you tell us about the comedy scene in India?
Yes I can. It’s great, the comics are evolving at a rapid pace and there is an excitement around the scene that will really put India on the map as a great source of comedy for the future. There is an incredible history there, India has endured a lot and Indian people today thrive everywhere under any circumstances. India has an abundance of wealth to transmute into comedy.

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You’re quite the internationalist – can you tell us briefly about your travels?
Thanks to comedy, I have got to travel a lot. When I do, I do my best to learn about the countries I visit and absorb their history, culture and customs. Travelling is such a great way to enrich your life and meet the beautiful diverse array of people and stories of the world, essentially travelling itself feels like a divine endeavour. Or like discovering the entire map of the video game you are otherwise restricted through by the responsibility of work and citizenship.

Do you find all that travel a good source of material?
Yes, but not just because of the travel but because of the life experiences you have. Your material is only ever going to be as a good as your experience and discipline towards learning and writing everyday.

You’re performing at this year’s MAGNERS INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL; can you tell us where & when?
I’ll be performing at the Cask & Banger in Singapore.

You’ve got 20 seconds to sell your show to somebody in the street…
My show is for people who like to both think and laugh. If you like your comedy evolved, then you’ll enjoy my show because I am really, really good at what I do and I love sharing my ideas because we can make the world a better place by laughing at how stupid we can all be.

What will Imran Yusuf be doing for the rest of 2019?
Working on my next solo show and touring in both the spring and then again in late autumn.


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IMRAN YUSUF

Cask & Banger, Singapore

March 15th, 2019

www.imranyusuf.com

Lewis Doherty: From Wolf to Boar

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Lewis Doherty… working on a follow up to Wolf… thank-you Comedy Gods!


Hello Lewis, so what did you get for Christmas?
Hiya! I got some ridiculous hot sauce called Mega Death, which was a highlight(?)

Last Fringe was quite a dramatic inception for Wolf. Were you surprised by the public reaction?
Yes and no; Its a show that I’m really proud of and I knew once people saw it and started talking about it in Edinburgh then it would snowball from there. One thing that did surprise me was just how accessible the show was. I really thought it would have quite a niche audience but since doing Edinburgh I’ve had people bring their kids, mums, grandparents (who love it!) So that’s been a great surprise so far.

Last August I had the pleasure of bumping into you personally. I found the real Lewis a pleasant, rather humble man – a far cry from the character on stage. How did you manage to create such a restless, ebullient stage persona?
Awww shucks! Thanks! I suppose I just love performing, so there’s a part of me I present on stage that enjoys doing it.

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Will you be touring Wolf in 2019, & if so where?
Yeah, absolutely! I’m currently touring right now! I’ve just finished a run at the Birmingham REP and I’m at the Nottingham Playhouse 15th, 16th Feb – then we hit up Leicester Comedy Festival on the 23rd, over to Waterside Arts Centre on the 28th, then Exeter Phoenix 10th March, and finishing up at SOHO Theatre 21st -23rd March! Its been amazing so far – I’m hoping that I can reach a wider audience this year with the show and tour again next year – so If you do miss it or it isn’t coming to a city close enough, keep your eyes peeled!

You have been working on something new, can you tell us about it?
Sure! I’ve been working on a new show called BOAR (another animal themed title) its a medieval action epic tale about two bounty hunters who end up being sent on a quest to defeat an evil dragon and save a princess

For someone who saw Wolf, will they be experiencing a generic sequel
or something quite different?
I’m trying to keep the skeleton of the show (WOLF) intact but I think its really important to keep creating and experimenting with new elements, that’s why I’ve decided to switch genre and go with a completely different set of characters – I’m still trying to develop this “one man show language” and I want to keep it engaging for audiences as well as myself – otherwise its just WOLF with different packaging.

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Was Boar easier or a more difficult creation than Wolf?
Tough question; It was easier because I’ve already done WOLF so I feel like I understand what it takes to develop a show like that, and what works with audiences. Also harder, because the genre I’ve decided to take on is typically more epic and has a lot more story strands to it, so the development and creation of BOAR has been a very different beast to the first

You will be performing one show at Vault Festival – how did you get
the gig & why?
I’ll be doing BOAR at Vault Festival on the 6th March, 9:15pm. I applied basically – its a fantastic festival with some interesting things going on and a great platform to showcase work.

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Have you performed at Vault before?
Yep! I did the first ever showing of WOLF there – it was 30minutes long and I’ve never been so nervous in my LIFE! Everyone that came to the gig that night was great though

I know you like to catch other acts – is there anything in particular
at Vault you fancy?
There are so many things! Here’s a list off the top of my head of stuff I’m trying to get to:

Bottled by Hayley Wareham
Thrown by Living Record
Police Cops
The Wrong Ffion Jones
Alcatraz by Right Mess
Jack Barry WIP
Spencer Jones WIP
WOOD by Adam Foster
See-Through by Claire Gaydon

Will you be bringing Boar to Edinburgh?
Hell yeah, and maybe even a cheeky couple of WOLF shows too!


Boar

March 6th, Vault Festival, London

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An Interview with Sam See

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Sam See & the Magners International Comedy Festival have been bosom-buddies since the inception. This year sees Sam See back in in Singapore…


Hello Sam, so where are you from & where are you at, geographically speaking?
I was born in Singapore, and still based here, mainly gigging in the South East Asia region. Never lived anywhere else, but let’s see where comedy takes me in the future!

When did you first develop a passion for comedy?
It’s a bit hard to pinpoint, because as a kid I consumed a very diverse collection of comedy. From the local Singaporean comedy of the drag queen comedian Kumar, to the music videos of Weird Al Yankovich and then to the British sitcoms like Allo Allo and Mind Your Language. I remember always trying to add comedy into my school presentations (without much success), as well as forcing the class to watch Clue again and again till the laughed at the right points. So I’d say I found comedy as a child, much to the chagrin of everyone else around me.

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What is the creative process behind writing your comedic material?
Slow as hell. Great comics sit down everyday to write great works of humour. I am no great comic. I only start writing a bit if I’m moved by emotions or excitement, hence why the bits always have anger, confusion or a desperation behind them, in my opinion. I test them out at shows after, try to fix them, fail on the first three attempts, throw the bit away, run back to pick it up after I realize I need new material and then make it better overtime. Sometimes I can come back to the joke after a few days, sometimes a few months. I still have jokes that are still sitting around from years ago, I’m waiting till I’m experienced enough to approach them, because if you’re gonna touch the testier topics, you best damn well be prepared.

What are your improv skills like?
Depends on who you ask. I’ve been told I was fantastic to my face and then downright awful online, so I guess I’m pretty good at first glance. I started out with a fantastic improv troupe called the Laecomers, who specialized in short and long form simultaneously. I’ve sinced stepped away from the troupe to focus on my stand-up, but have learnt plenty from them, especially how to ‘sell’ alcohol without a liquor licence. PM me if you want the details.

What are the secrets to a good joke?
Writing and delivery, but the most important thing: having an audience to tell it to.

What does Sam See like to do when he’s not being funny?
I was studying video game programming before I got into comedy, so I’m a heavy gamer. Nothing multiplayer, mind you. Too anti social and not fond of 8 year old kids calling me names online. I prefer my hecklers to be there in person. I’ve also been trying to pick up cross-stitching, something more soothing to do after shows, but I keep passing it up for the more calming alternative: hard liquor.

You’re quite a name on the Asian comedy circuit, headlining cities like Melbourne, Malaysia, Tokyo, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Oman and the Philippines; but which is your favorite country to perform in & why?
Tricky, tricky question there, but if I had to pick, I’d say [INSERT YOUR COUNTRY HERE]. I really love [INSERT YOUR COUNTRY HERE], the people are so nice and welcoming, crowds laugh so hard and most of all, I love eating [INSERT YOUR LOCAL FOOD HERE]. I’d dare say it’s the best dish in the entire world, fight me about it.

Can you tell us about MAGNERS INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL?
I’ve worked with the Magners team for many years, since the first one back in 2014. They are a passionate bunch of people that want to bring both regional and international comedy to Asia, and I believe they will succeed at their goal, especially if they keep booking me every year.


Book Tickets for the Gala Night


You’re performing at this year’s festival; can you tell us where, when & who with?
I’ll be hosting the Singapore Gala Show, on the 21st of March at Pong, in Clarke Quay. Joining me will be some fantastic acts, like local funnyman Jinx Yeo, SG/US export Jocelyn Chia, Aussie boy Shayne Hunter, Irishman Kevin Gildea and rounding out the pack, the winner of the 2018 Edinburgh Fringe Festival, ‘So You think You’re Funny’, Danny Garnell. Tickets are still available at the festival website, which I’m sure you’ll find below.

What will you be doing for the rest of 2019?
I’m planning to head up to the legendary Edinburgh Fringe Festival in August, and then bring that hour back to SG and perform it in a theatre, so let’s see how all that goes. Also, I’ll probably be trying to pick up cross-stitching again. Stay tuned for knitting-based updates.

www.mrsamsee.com


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An Interview with Aidan Killian

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Two years ago, Aidan Killian performed at the Magners Comedy Festival in Asia. The next year he got massively involved. The Mumble thought we’d get the lowdown…


Hello Aidan, so where ya from & where ya at, geographically speaking?
Dublin, Ireland but like many Irish my feet wader around the globe so now I am on an island in Thailand called, Koh Samui and tomorrow I will be in Singapore. I jump from country to country performing in Manila, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Tokyo, Saigon, Singapore, Shanghai and so on.

When did you first realise you were funny?
When I was doing Mister Bean impressions to my granny and her teeth fell out from laughing so hard. They whole family paid attention to me; thy laughed, uncles patted my head and they al gave me sweets. It was more than being funny it also gave me my first taste of power. Like a mini dictator, I was emperor of the family.. for a few minutes.

How did you get into comedy?
I was an investment bank in Tokyo and had to do public speaking but was terrified so I did stand up to help me. It was the cure needed. I even got a few laughs with that shite I was spouting out my mouth and once again the inner dictator shouted MOOORREEEE!! Soon I quit banking, lost all my wealth and worked as a poor comedian trying to make my way it in the mad world of comedy (which is often more competitive than banking).

What is it about being funny in front of other people that makes you tick?
What is more enjoyable in the world than to make people happy. It’s probably like the buzz Jesus got when he healed the sick. Yes what I am saying is that comedians have the attributes of God.

What are the key ingredients to your style?
Connect with people. Bring them on my story. Let them feel. Leaving laughing while thinking something positive about humanity

How did you get involved with the Magners Asian comedy festival?
The employed me as a comic in 2017. I toured 6 countries with them and loved it. Then I blagged my way in and now I am a partner. I love it. I love working with my partner Matt Bennett and the comedy promoters all over Asia and Magners who make it happen. I have a soft spot for Magners since they are 100% Irish so I feel a bit of national pride too. every time someone laughs an apple tree gets planted in Ireland :).

How has the festival evolved over the years?
In 2014/15, before me, they lost money, brought in about 25-30 acts from all over the world but now the scene has grown so much we can get half the acts from Asia. There are strong weekly comedy clubs like Singapore’s The Merry Lion, Kuala Lumpur’s The Crackhouse, and Shanghai’s Comedy Bunker. So we work with these clubs and other monthly clubs like, StandupAsia who bring over great acts too. Last year we brought over Doug Stanhope and Bill Bailey, this year we have Tom Green and are talking to some other big names too. The festival is evolving and the comedy scene is also evolving. Evolve or die!

How do you decide upon the acts?
I got to Edinburgh Fringe every year and choose whoever wears the highest pants. Nah I usually just pick people I respect and want to work with. I know that are funny and will be easy to travel with. I avoid anyone who I think would be high maintenance.

What have you got lined up for us this year?
Tom Green, Imran Yusuf, Stephen K Amos, Phil Nichol, Dana Alexander, Sam See, Jinx Yeo, Jocelyn Chia, Kevin Gildea, Ro Campbell, Trevor Lock and so many more.

Do you cater for local comedians
Yes we do. We love them and they are growing fast. I know you are not meant to have favourites but I love Sam See from Singapore.

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Shanghai

What’s the difference between an Asian comedy audience & an Irish?
The Irish are surrounded by hilarious people and you will never be as funny as their mate, Barry. The rule in Ireland is that you can do what you like but if you are sexist, homophobic, racist etc. people will not laugh… even if you are not but you talk about the subject they will tighten up their arse-cheeks in fear but in Asia they don’t give a shite about this. They are more direct in some ways for example, it would not be rude for an Asian to say, “you are fat” and then pinch your belly. The Asia audience will find it hilarious when you slag off whatever Asian country is close by.

What will you be doing for the rest of 2019?
After Magners International Comedy festival is done I will take my beloved for a holiday, I shall go home to Ireland to see my family and I will continue working on and developing my Edinburgh show which I will call ‘Imposter Syndrome’ or ‘Faking it’ or ‘Not good enough’.

www.aidankillian.com


MAGNERS INTERNATIONAL

COMEDY FESTIVAL

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