Lewis Doherty: From Wolf to Boar

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Lewis Doherty… working on a follow up to Wolf… thank-you Comedy Gods!


Hello Lewis, so what did you get for Christmas?
Hiya! I got some ridiculous hot sauce called Mega Death, which was a highlight(?)

Last Fringe was quite a dramatic inception for Wolf. Were you surprised by the public reaction?
Yes and no; Its a show that I’m really proud of and I knew once people saw it and started talking about it in Edinburgh then it would snowball from there. One thing that did surprise me was just how accessible the show was. I really thought it would have quite a niche audience but since doing Edinburgh I’ve had people bring their kids, mums, grandparents (who love it!) So that’s been a great surprise so far.

Last August I had the pleasure of bumping into you personally. I found the real Lewis a pleasant, rather humble man – a far cry from the character on stage. How did you manage to create such a restless, ebullient stage persona?
Awww shucks! Thanks! I suppose I just love performing, so there’s a part of me I present on stage that enjoys doing it.

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Will you be touring Wolf in 2019, & if so where?
Yeah, absolutely! I’m currently touring right now! I’ve just finished a run at the Birmingham REP and I’m at the Nottingham Playhouse 15th, 16th Feb – then we hit up Leicester Comedy Festival on the 23rd, over to Waterside Arts Centre on the 28th, then Exeter Phoenix 10th March, and finishing up at SOHO Theatre 21st -23rd March! Its been amazing so far – I’m hoping that I can reach a wider audience this year with the show and tour again next year – so If you do miss it or it isn’t coming to a city close enough, keep your eyes peeled!

You have been working on something new, can you tell us about it?
Sure! I’ve been working on a new show called BOAR (another animal themed title) its a medieval action epic tale about two bounty hunters who end up being sent on a quest to defeat an evil dragon and save a princess

For someone who saw Wolf, will they be experiencing a generic sequel
or something quite different?
I’m trying to keep the skeleton of the show (WOLF) intact but I think its really important to keep creating and experimenting with new elements, that’s why I’ve decided to switch genre and go with a completely different set of characters – I’m still trying to develop this “one man show language” and I want to keep it engaging for audiences as well as myself – otherwise its just WOLF with different packaging.

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Was Boar easier or a more difficult creation than Wolf?
Tough question; It was easier because I’ve already done WOLF so I feel like I understand what it takes to develop a show like that, and what works with audiences. Also harder, because the genre I’ve decided to take on is typically more epic and has a lot more story strands to it, so the development and creation of BOAR has been a very different beast to the first

You will be performing one show at Vault Festival – how did you get
the gig & why?
I’ll be doing BOAR at Vault Festival on the 6th March, 9:15pm. I applied basically – its a fantastic festival with some interesting things going on and a great platform to showcase work.

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Have you performed at Vault before?
Yep! I did the first ever showing of WOLF there – it was 30minutes long and I’ve never been so nervous in my LIFE! Everyone that came to the gig that night was great though

I know you like to catch other acts – is there anything in particular
at Vault you fancy?
There are so many things! Here’s a list off the top of my head of stuff I’m trying to get to:

Bottled by Hayley Wareham
Thrown by Living Record
Police Cops
The Wrong Ffion Jones
Alcatraz by Right Mess
Jack Barry WIP
Spencer Jones WIP
WOOD by Adam Foster
See-Through by Claire Gaydon

Will you be bringing Boar to Edinburgh?
Hell yeah, and maybe even a cheeky couple of WOLF shows too!


Boar

March 6th, Vault Festival, London

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Russell Brand’s Re:Birth and his Critique of the British Comic Figurehead

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While knowing Russell Brand mainly through his activism and political commentaries, I found myself pleasantly surprised at the eloquence of his new stand-up special Re:Birth. Among his excoriating critiques on British politics, the mass media and political power, I couldn’t help but notice that a major target of his special was himself, particularly as he highlighted his interventions in British political debate and by discussing how he wrestled with his role as a British political comic figurehead. Alongside some rich material on being a father and his past drug addiction issues, it’s this quality of self-interrogation that for me really stood out in Re:Birth.

One element of the show that in my opinion worked very well was Brand’s use of short video segments. I’ve found many political comedians’ use of videos during their acts somewhat laboured, often being employed to act as a means of delivering a punchline without putting in the effort. However, in Re:Birth, the videos he uses encapsulate Brand’s self-confessed, awkward dalliances between comedian and political activist, mocking his infamous interview with Jeremy Paxman on Newsnight, a recording of a pre-presidency Donald Trump in which he called Brand a loser, and a final segment in which the comedian invokes an exaggerated, Danny Dyer-ish Cockney accent while in battle with a journo outside 10 Downing Street.

Between segments, the videos work well because they strike at the heart of Brand’s comic message, which, refreshingly, also tears down his authority as a political comedian, or at the very least, questions his ability to effectively translate complex messages through mass media. This material is reinforced by his numerous, eloquent and sincerely heart-felt critiques of the merciless cruelties of the British tabloid media, as well as the myopic disconnect of political culture with everyday life, the latter of which he brilliantly compares to a well-oiled machine of continuous bullshit. It is in these moments that Brand comes into his own, and we remember why, for all his foibles, he still plays a distinctive role in the corridor between British comedy and politics. In essence, Re:Birth acts as a form of comic referendum on his struggles with how he sees himself as a public figure, where the comedian, through videos of his appearances on British news, invites the audience to recognise the contrast with his media image, while simultaneously embracing the numerous contradictions to which he readily admits. In one section in particular, he jokes about the various personalities he possesses that can pop out unexpectedly, giving a slight Whitmanesque vibe to his presentation.

The only major criticism I have with Re:Birth however is Brand’s use of dance movements and raps as forms of punchline or tags, which seemed more akin to a nightmarish Blackpool matinee. I found myself cringing at several of these interludes, which in my opinion did a disservice to both his likeability as a comedian and the political shrewdness of his material, making segments of his special less like Bill Hicks and more like “Knees Up, Mother Brown”. However, in perhaps the strongest portion of his show, and the one that testifies to his eloquence as a political comedian, he recalls his initially reluctant involvement in the New Era Estate rent row. With the protest reaching the steps of 10 Downing Street, Brand recounts how the activists were inevitably side-lined by the media, who unsurprisingly focused on him. He narrates how he remedied this by shifting attention to one of the main activists, Lindsey, during his interview. His subsequent appraisal of Lindsey, as an activist and a fighter is beautifully conveyed, and serves to remind us of Brand’s genuine sympathy with public activism, as well as his own generosities as an entertainer.

In settling on what makes Re:Birth worth watching, it’s not just that’s its funny. Quite the opposite in some segments; some of it, such as his rap / dance / Cockney japes, is frankly a little upsetting to watch. However, it’s also quite comprehensive in terms of the material it grapples with. For example, a recurring theme is his toying with the concept of “simulacrum”, the analysis of something that looks like or represents something else. He employs this effectively in his portrayal of his expectation vs. the reality of watching his child be born, or in his description of the anticipated authority of 10 Downing Street feeling more like a deserted movie set when he visited it during his involvement in the New Era Estate rent row. This disconnect can be extended to Brand’s self-perception as a political comic firebrand / radical / Daily Mail nemesis vs. his personal introspection regarding his efficacy as a political commentator and activist. In fact, he spends a good part of his special arguing that he might be best steering clear of complex political commentaries and forms of activism altogether to avoid jeopardising the possibility of left-wing policies he favours. As he reflects in his material on the successes of the New Era Estate rent row, he argues, “that’s what happens…when people come together, in pursuit of common idea, there is great power. So, I suppose, the lesson was, ‘Russell, shut the fuck up.” [Laughter.]”

In doing so, Re:Birth provides a refreshing take on contemporary British political comedy in the way in which it questions its own worth in the public sphere. While British comedy is nowhere near as traumatised as its American sister and its cultural defeat at the hands of the satire-proof titan of Donald Trump, Brand’s special gives glimpses into the nature of this mode of culture and its relationship with public commentary and politics. While his stand-up provides a poignant example of the championing qualities of British political comedy, with its exploration of alternative ideas, protection of the downtrodden and its ridiculing of old cruelties, Brand also gives us cause to reflect on the exalted role of comedians as contemporary social and political guardians by highlighting their own limitations. In doing so, it stands out as an intelligent and self-aware piece of stand-up comedy and I look forward to his future contributions. I just hope he goes a bit easier on the dad raps next time.

James Nixon

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Preview: Dave Gorman

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Dave Gorman is in Edinburgh this week…


Funny man Dave Gorman comes to Edinburgh Playhouse this week as part of his With Great Powerpoint Comes Great Responsibilitypoint tour. It was announced in June that the upcoming (already largely sold out) tour has been extended for a second time with 19 new shows added in early 2019.

Starting this September and now playing 61 shows at some of the biggest theatres in the country, including Edinburgh Playhouse on Sunday 9 September, this tour will see Dave combine his unique and critically acclaimed style of stand-up and visual story-telling. As the title suggests, Dave is bringing his laptop and projector screen with him so expect the ‘King of Powerpoint comedy’ (The Guardian) to have more detailed analysis of those parts of life you’ve never stopped to think about before.  Hey, not all heroes wear capes.

Ratings and critical hit, Dave Gorman Modern Life Is Goodish returned to Dave in 2018 for a fifth series – attracting a peak of 1.5 million viewers and regularly receiving a total audience of over a million per episode, the show is one of UKTV and Dave’s (the channel) most successful original commissions.

This will be Dave Gorman’s first new live tour show in four years and follows on from Dave Gorman Gets Straight To The Point* (*The Power Point).  A two-time extended sell-out UK nationwide tour, it saw Dave sell out four shows at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall, as well as the Hammersmith Apollo, and take the show to New York for a ten-night run off-Broadway.

 


With Great Powerpoint

Comes Great Responsibility

EDINBURGH PLAYHOUSE

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Sun 9 September, 8pm

www.atgtickets.com

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Spontaneous Sherlock

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Monkey Barrel Comedy Club
Edinburgh
Thursday 28th August, 2018


The Fringe is coming, God Bless us all, & the Mumble dragon is slowly awakening, ready to spread its wings over the Scottish capital & breathe flames of burning criticism into the myriad venues like a Smaug over a Lake Town. What better, this reviewer thought, than to go out into the heart of Edinburgh & catch a recent Fringe classic – Spontaneous Sherlock – at the infinitely amiable Monkey Barrel Comedy Club. A big hit in 2015 & ’16, this particular improv party is about to make way in the public’s affections for a new kid on the block, Spontaneous Potter.

Gentleman: How much do you love John Watson?
Sherlock: Love is a strong word for an Englishman!

I was glad then to catch a modern classic, so to speak, before it was possibly too late. Before the show begins each audience member is asked to write a title down on a slip of paper, which is subsequently drawn from a hat & about which the tale of intrigue & adventure will be loosely wound. Mine was ‘Sherlock Holmes & the Lesbian of Doom,’ in order to amuse my Sappho-inspired lady friend up from Todmorden, but unfortunately another was drawn, entitled the rather apt, ‘Sherlock Holmes & the time England won the World Cup.’ From this catalyst the Victorian capers ensued, full of Austro-Hungarianisms & temper’d by smart interjections whenever the dialogue drifted offtime, such as the arrival of Einstein who was, we were quickly told, in fact a teenager!

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Great praise must be given to Jenny Laahs, whose authentic piano plunking perfectly set the mood for the action, playing away as if in a dream blossoming in some Victorian-era oriental opium den. Over her wee reverie of sound came the sketches, played out with perpetual effervescence by the fuzzball of energy that was Will Naameh (the Queen), Paul Connolly (Watson), Mara Joy (all the rest) & special guest Stu Murphy, who pulled off a quite demented Sherlock with the delicate assurity of his extemporizational genius.

Its simply eggnog laced with owl anti-venom

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Improvisational comedy, when its done well, is like an eight-year-old girl’s birthday party; where a gaggle of mini-hens strut about laughing, joking, & most importantly, pretending. The quartet before us oscillated between harmonious hilarity to confused nonsense-babbling, but it was all great fun to watch & follow. I must offer a word of warning, however; this show is heavily based on the Sherlock TV programme, & positively bubbles with injokery. But set aside & stood alone, immersing yourself in Spontaneous Sherlock’s silly seriousness is a splendid session rather akin to having a mind jacuzzi with bubbles, relaxing & frantic at the same time!

Damian Beeson Bullen